Addiction & Relationships

Why A Relationship May Be Difficult For An Addict

  Why A Relationship May Be Difficult For An Addict An addiction is a relationship. When someone is addicted to a substance and/or a behavior, that person is in a relationship with their substance or behavior of choice, the same as if they were involved with a person. Further, the relationship with the object of their addiction is the most important relationship in his/her life. He or she will do anything to protect that relationship and keep it alive, i.e. deny it, lie about it, cover it up, minimize it, blame others, etc. When a person with an addiction enters into a significant relationship, he or she is not entering more »

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treating core issues

The Importance Of Addressing Your Core Issues

  The Importance Of Addressing Your Core Issues The average approach to substance abuse treatment for the past several decades has been a crash course on the 12 steps. There is no doubt that the 12 steps provided a much needed solution to issues related to alcoholism, however AA’s stated intention was not to discount or deny the importance of treating core issues as an adjunct to the 12 steps. Moreover, Alcoholics Anonymous was to be forever non-professional, with the stated primary purpose “ to stay sober and help other alcoholics to achieve sobriety.” The vast majority of the treatment industry has been teaching the 12 steps as the primary more »

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What is Emotional Abuse

What Is Emotional Abuse?

  What is emotional abuse?  Are you a victim of someone’s mind games?  Nobody enjoys being played, but predators enjoy playing people. They enjoy the game of cat-and-mouse and seek pleasure from reeling in their next vulnerable victim.  More often than not, people who are prone to being taken advantage of by potential abusers overlook their innocent facades.  In fact, they often make excuses for them, even when they’re being poorly mistreated by toxic behavior.  Why would this be? Those whom tend to emotionally abuse people aren’t always obvious. They may be male or female. They can disguise themselves by being charming but he minimization of your needs is paramount. more »

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Remaining Active In Recovery

Remaining Active In Recovery

Remaining Active In Recovery The people you surround yourself with may influence your recovery or hasten a relapse. The people that surround you are a reflection of yourself. When you leave treatment, you are no longer the person you once were, but are instead a brand new version of yourself. If you go back and hang out with the friends or family members that got you into trouble in the first place, you are setting yourself up for failure. A person’s environment is an important factor to maintaining recovery. Your living space can be another contributing factor for relapse. Most former active addicts lived in an area that had easy more »

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Improving Self Esteem

Improving Self Esteem

Improving Self Esteem It is not unusual for people in treatment for addiction to describe feeling like they never belonged, how they never fit in or how they always felt ‘less than’ other people around them. For anyone who felt that way growing up, using substances may have been the first time they were able to quiet those feelings.  Briefly and early on in substance abuse, drugs and alcohol can give an individual a glimpse of what if might actually be like to feel good, about life and about oneself. The factors that contribute to low self esteem include trauma, disapproval from parents or authority figures, uninvolved parents/caregivers, extensive bullying more »

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Binge Eating

Binge Eating

Binge Eating When you think about an eating disorder, you might think about restricting food, like in anorexia, or purging food, like in bulimia. But the most common eating disorder has nothing to do with either of those. It’s called binge eating. These days when we hear the word ‘binge,’ we mostly think of watching like 6 episodes of the Netflix show in one day. And If you’re less TV-inclined, maybe you think of binging on food. Say, on Thanksgiving. But what if you found yourself overeating like that multiple times a week?  What if it felt like a cycle and it got really difficult to control? This is what more »

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